Payback

We at EAU advocate economic nationalism, which places the economy at the service of the nation; we believe that the welfare of our people should supersede all other things, including the ability of multinational corporations and the government to exploit or ignore our people for unbridled profits and uninformed votes. But we clearly have a long way to go. I’m about as sick of being politically ethnically and morally ripped off as you are. While many of us cannot claim to be an economist or a soldier of fortune with the ability to fix the problem, “another tune” needs to be sung as soon as possible.

So don’t ever expect politicians and other know-it-alls to admit that everything is interconnected in the world of prices.

Two Russian economists, Nikolai Shmelev and Vladimir Popov, agree that “the smallest change in one element is passed along the chain to millions of others.” In other words when there is a large increase in the demand for ice cream it can raise the price of baseball mitts. Honest…

When everything is related via systems and sub-systems however distant, arbitrary government policy that sets a finicky goal has unintended consequences that, in turn, have other unintended consequences. When the federal government tried to make home ownership more “affordable” to minorities in the 1990s by coercing the very banking houses they are now bailing out to do so, that wonderful idea ripped through the economy like the flu and gave birth to the current unemployment / Titanic scenario.

Essentially, Congress directed federal regulatory agencies to lean on banks to lend money to people the banks felt could not repay the loans including properly profiled Mexicans and poor blacks. When everything started going to hell, true to form politicians pointed the finger of blame to the banks(!) in order to sidetrack our attention from their own terrible regulations.

Republicans and Democrats bear the guilt and ought to pay in a slow painful manner.

Fear of government is more effective than government itself.

Fear of government is more effective than government itself.

Only in the make believe world of Washington DC will worse regulation fix bad regulation. To say it would be a good idea to reject the poorly revised “affordable” housing Community Reinvestment Act is an understatement.

What’s more, if one looks at the spike in food prices created directly by the push to add ethanol in fuel, or if we look at the unsustainability of Medicare spending, along with the kind of government waste that would put 99.99% of the population in prison, the record of government meddling in the economy has been so unmanageable voters should realize that more regulation furthering centralized control of health care will cost us not only wealth and quality of care, but also the very freedoms our European ancestors fought and died to protect.

However commendable goals might appear to be in the mainstream media, they are not worth the institutional failure history has repeatedly taught us to expect. Like I said, when everything is related via systems and sub-systems, however distant, arbitrary government policy that sets a finicky goal will have unintended consequences that, in turn, have other unintended consequences. In this case we can ultimately & justifiably cite the abject erosion of European Americans’ political social and economic standing in the nation of their fore fathers. Facts are facts. No one voted for this insanity (except for a handful of well organized fetish leaning Bolsheviks).

On the other hand, even now in the eleventh hour we can still turn things around. But in all likelihood it’s liable to be one messy proposition. Get hot.

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